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Date: 21.02.2015
From: Chris Parkinson

Subject: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Hi,

Please see my thread on a new book by a famous French doctor.

Here is something (nothing to do with the book) which, though not a cure, will I believe give quick and fairly long lasting relief for joint pain.

I need some guinea pigs to try it out and report on the results. This is what you do:

Get some Savoy cabbage. The dark green, outer leaves are best. Carefully cut out the central vein. You need enough leaves to cover the painful area and a bit more of the surrounding area. Put the leaves on a board or counter and roll over them with a bottle to crush all the subsidiary veins. Dip the leaves quickly in some warm to hot water. Now wrap the leaves round the affected area with each leaf overlapping the last one by about an inch or so. Put a bandage around the leaves to hold them tightly in place. Keep your cabbage leaf poultice on all day. Before retiring, take off the old leaves and put some new ones on and wear to bed.

Tell me how you got on.

Cheers Chris
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Date: 21.02.2015
From: Sally

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Midwives used to recommend putting cabbage leaves in womens bras, to relieve engorged breasts during and after pregnancy.
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Date: 21.02.2015
From: Sean

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Found this... who knows?

The common green cabbage (Brassica capitata) is used for engorgement therapy. Cabbage is known to contain sinigrin (allylisothiocyanate) rapine, mustard oil, magnesium, oxylate and sulphur heterosides. Herbalists believe that cabbage has both antibiotic and anti irritant properties. It is theorized that this natural mixture of ingredients helps decrease tissue congestion by dilating (opening) local capillaries (small blood vessels) improving the blood flow in the area -

References to cabbage compresses for swelling and engorgement date back to the early 1800's. Cabbage compresses have also been used to reduce the swelling in sprains and broken bones.
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Date: 21.02.2015
From: lois (marlene)

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

I have to say Sean this post has me very interest.
I do know some of the qualities of some spices herbs but cabbage is a new one for me. I do eat cabbage but as for healing compresses I had never heard of it.

I always read your post's with interest but this one in particular caught my attention.
Thanks.

How are you doing in yourself?
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Date: 21.02.2015
From: lois

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Sorry Sean should have read very interested
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Date: 21.02.2015
From: Chris Parkinson

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Hi Sean,

Can you give me a URL for your reference?
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Date: 21.02.2015
From: Sean

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Not a site I visit on a regular basis :) but the article itself has further references...

http://www.lactationconsultant.info/cabbagecure.html
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Date: 22.02.2015
From: lucy

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Dock leaves are a cure for nettle stings so perhaps using cabbage leaves could help with the inflammation - worth a try.
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Date: 23.02.2015
From: Sally

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Yes Sean that is a site you may want to delete from your search history , how would you explain that one ? :) The humble cabbage does seem to be overflowing with good stuff. I knew the benefits of consuming cruciferous beforehand but I didn't know it was an anti inflammatory and thought to contain antibiotic properties too.
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Date: 23.02.2015
From: Chris Parkinson

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Cabbage juice is also a miracle cure for ulcers. Better than any drug.

Be careful with cabbage juice or eating too much cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables. They contain goitrogens which prevent the uptake of the trace elements of iodine which the thyroid needs to function properly. If you do the Seignalet diet I recommend eating a table spoon full of sauerkraut at least once a day. Don't overdo it though because of the goitrogens.

Cheers Chris
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Date: 23.02.2015
From: Sally

Subject: Re: Clinical trial of cabbage leaf ;-)

Cruciferous can also prevent calcium being absorbed.I looked at the Seignet diet and it suggests consuming raw foods including meat. That is something I would find impossible to do and I am someone that gagged when I tried Sushi, so raw fish is out too. I wouldn't be happy about eating so much uncooked food as this could lead to parasites being ingested .
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